Prof Ian Acworth receives IAH President's award at Perth 2013 IAH Congress

Posted 3 December 2013

Professor Ken Howard presents the IAH President’s Award to Professor Ian Acworth at the IAH Annual Meeting in Perth, 16th September 2013.

Prof. Ian Acworth was presented with the IAH Presidents Award by Prof. Ken Howard for his research contributions to hydrogeology and his service to the IAH.

The award is given annually by the current president of International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH).

2013 President’s Award citation

Professor Ian Acworth

The President’s Award of the Association is given annually to a hydrogeologist who has made outstanding international contributions to the development or application of groundwater science, and to furthering IAH’s mission to promote understanding and management of groundwater resource. This year’s award goes to someone who meets both criteria – Professor Ian Acworth.

Ian Acworth grew up in the south of England and then obtained a degree in Earth Sciences from LeedsUniversity in 1973 and started his first job with Halcrows. Ian quickly realised he needed a further qualification in groundwater for the engineers to take him seriously and in 1974 he enrolled for the MSc in Hydrogeology at Birmingham University. He then worked in Nigeria until John Lloyd persuaded him to go back to Birmingham in 1979 to do a PhD on geophysical exploration for groundwater in the fractured rock aquifers he had become familiar with in Nigeria.

After returning to the consulting world to manage the Hydrogeology and Geophysics group at Wimpey Laboratories and with a young family, Ian decided against further overseas work in difficult locations and in 1988 set off to Australia and the University of New South Wales. He has been there ever since, building up the teaching and research programme, establishing and developing the Connected Waters Initiative and is now the Gary Johnston Professor of Water management. Through this distinguished academic career, Ian has maintained research interests in the investigation of groundwater resources, geophysics, dryland salinity processes, coastal zones and contaminated groundwater, publishing widely in all of these.

Ian has been a member and active supporter of IAH for many years, as a member of the Australian National Committee and from 2004 to 2012 as IAH Vice President for Australasia and the Pacific. During this time his wise words in Council were always greatly appreciated.

Professor Acworth, you are a worthy recipient of the 2013 President’s Award.

Ken Howard
President

Latest news

Groundwater resources in Africa resilient to climate change

Groundwater resources in Africa resilient to climate change

8 August 2019

Groundwater – a vital source of water for drinking and irrigation across sub-Saharan Africa – is resilient to climate variability and change, according to a new study.

Read more…

 Low cost way to explore groundwater resources could be game changer

Low cost way to explore groundwater resources could be game changer

10 May 2019

UNSW Sydney water engineers have revealed that investigating and managing groundwater resources more sustainably can be achieved at lower cost by using existing Earth and atmospheric tidal data.

Read more…

CWI Director addressed National Ground Water Monitoring issues in ABC News

CWI Director addressed National Ground Water Monitoring issues in ABC News

5 March 2019

The Director of CWI was recently quoted on the ABC story: ‘ Who's watching the water? Experts sound warning on deteriorating groundwater monitoring’

Read more…

Spotlight on mining and water with Dr Wendy Timms

Spotlight on mining and water with Dr Wendy Timms

10 November 2017

Dr Wendy Timms talks about her many hats and why diversity is critical in sustainable mining practice.

Read more…

Groundwater ‘pit stops’ enabled survival and migration of our ancient ancestors

Groundwater ‘pit stops’ enabled survival and migration of our ancient ancestors

1 June 2017

African groundwater helped kick-start the evolutionary history of humans, with the movement of our ancestors across East Africa shaped by the location of springs, new research suggests.

Read more…