GWI Global Water Matters Podcast

Posted 21 June 2020

The UNSW-GWI Global Water Matters Podcast was launched in 2020 to share interesting and important water-related developments and insights from global experts across the broad spectrum of water-related disciplines. Born from the demand to continue the Water Issues Commentary seminar series under the constraints of social distancing, new episodes are released monthly. The first 2 episodes are listed below. For more recent updates, visit the UNSW GWI page here.

Episode 1: Water Markets and Blockchain - Trading through New Digital Technologies

The first episode of the GWI Global Water Matters podcast features Katrina Donaghy, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder of Civic Ledger – a civic focusedblockchain Australian company – and Cameron Holley, Professor at UNSW Law.  In conversation with producer Gretchen Miller, Katrina and Cameron discuss the potential benefits of using blockchain technology in Australian water markets, the challenges that may occur and how the technology is being used ina pilot at the Mareeba-Dimbulah Water Supply Scheme in Far North Queensland.

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Episode 2: Insights from the Colorado River

The second episode of the GWI Global Water Matters podcast features Anne Castle, member of the Water Policy Group and Senior Fellow at the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy, and the Environment at the University of Colorado. In conversation with producer Gretchen Miller, Anne discusses the management and future of the over-allocated Colorado River Basin, its many competing interests, her personal experiences with the river and what it was like to meet Barack Obama during her time as Assistant Secretary for Water and Science at the U.S Department of Interior. 

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